Rotation.jpg
Mothers Artists.jpg
Migration.jpg
Throne.jpg
Palestine 6.jpg
Kite.jpg
Rotation.jpg

Rotation


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Rotation


ROTATION  |  JABAL AL-WEIBDEH AMMAN, JORDAN

“This work is a double tribute. On the one hand I’m talking about Jordan, a country that has a long history of hospitality towards refugees. Today, for example, there are over 1.6 million Syrian refugees and over 2 million Palestine refugees in Jordan.
On the other hand without knowing it, a big part of Jordan’s population and its future is being determined by, is in the hands of, the kids.” 
Pejac

Rotation was made in the bohemian and popular neighborhood of Jabal Al-Weibdeh in Amman, right next to a kids playground and close by the impressive King Abdullah I Mosque.

Mothers Artists.jpg

Mothers Artists


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Mothers Artists


MOTHERS ARTISTS  |  AL-AZRAQ SYRIAN REFUGEE CAMP, JORDAN

''A mother’s creativity is something truly admirable – how they manage to create a special world to protect their child by transforming reality into a better place.''  Pejac

This work was made in the refugee camp of Al-Azraq where over 30.000 Syrians live and 200 more arrive each day. 56% of its population are children, while a third of them live only with their mother as the head of the family and to whom this artwork is dedicated to.

In a creative and poetic manner the mother and child silhouette are compared to one in a painting by Spanish post impressionist Sorolla in the early 1900’s Playa de Valencia a la luz de la Mañana (Valencia Beach in the morning light).

Migration.jpg

Migration


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Migration


Throne.jpg

Throne


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Throne


Palestine 6.jpg

Palestine


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Palestine


Kite.jpg

Kite


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Kite


MIGRATION, THRONE, PALESTINE,  KITE | AL-HUSSEIN PALESTINIAN REFUGEE CAMP, JORDAN

''With these four small interventions i am trying to tell a minimalistic story about the Palestinian refugees in Al-Hussein. By removing small areas of the "skin" of the houses I want to transform the paint chipping, produced by the passage of time, into evocative landscapes and transmit the pride of its inhabitants through the walls.''     Pejac

Originally established back in 1948 as a result of the Arab-Israeli war, the camp provided shelter to the refugees who fled or were expelled during the Palestinian exodus. Almost 70 year since its opening, it is one of 10 such camps in Jordan, a country that is currently home to over 2 million Palestinian refugees.

This project was made with the support of the Spanish Embassy in Amman, Jordan.